Master of Indigenous Studies and Master of Māori Studies

The two master’s degrees provide a friendly and supportive learning environment for students through the (mostly) noho delivery model.

After completing a minimum of four papers either part time or full time, students opt for either a dissertation or thesis. This is the exciting time in a master’s degree where students are often completing research on a topic close to their hearts – it might be to do with their hapū or iwi; the school they teach in; or a social service, health or community problem. Alternatively, your thesis might be about a business, economic, art or environmental interest.

Every year an increasing number of our students also choose to write their thesis in te reo Māori. This is expanding the depth and breadth of Māori literature across all subjects – in te reo.

There are 8 thesis options available in the two master’s degrees (Master of Māori Studies and Master of Indigenous Studies). These enable students to study and research fields such as Māori Studies, Science, Māori Performing Arts, Business, Health, Creative Arts, Indigenous Studies and Education

Duration

The master's programme takes at least two years (and no more than six years part-time).  Students can choose between the following options:

  1. four papers (120 credits) and a thesis (120 credits)*; OR
  2. six papers (180 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits)**; OR
  3. seven papers (210 credits) and a research project (30 credits)**

including 30 credits from IHI803 and in the case of iii, a further 30 credits from IHI806.

* This option will lead to the PhD programme offered at Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi.

** These two pathways can lead only, in the first instance, to the Professional Doctorate offered at Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi.

Visit the Careers NZ website for more information on this qualification.

Cross credit application

If you have completed any papers at Level 8 these may be considered for cross-credit in to the programme. Only papers to the value of 60 credits can be cross-credited. When enrolling please indicate if you wish to apply for a cross-credit and an application form will be sent to you.

Online activities

Courses have an online element through eWananga LMS, so access to a laptop and internet connection is needed for postgraduate study.

Start Date
Dates
Semester 1 - 10 Feb to 20 Jun 2020, Semester 2 - 6 Jul to 21 Nov 2020. Thesis intakes 10 Feb to 21 Nov 2020, or 6 Jul to 10 Apr 2021.
Duration
Duration
40 weeks per year, 20 weeks per semester. One year full-time or two years part-time
Commitment
Commitment
View link for details
Applications Close
Applications close
1 Feb 2020 (Sem 1), 1 Jul 2020 (Sem 2)
Campus Location
Locations
Whakatāne, Tāmaki Makaurau
Requirements
Requirements
View link for details
Pathway
Pathway to
View link for details
Fees
Fees
Paper or Research project - $1477 each, Dissertation -$2955.50 per year, Thesis - $3590.00 per year. Admin fee - $93.50

Thesis (120 credits)

The thesis embodies the results obtained by a candidate in an investigation relating to some part of the subject of specialisation. Choose the discipline that relates to your topic:

IND800 - Indigenous
MAO800 - Māori
AKO800 - Education
MPA800 – Māori Performing Arts
MIB800 – Māori/Indigenous Business
TAI800 - Environment
TOI800- Creative Arts
ORA800 – Health Studies

IHI802 Dissertation (60 credits)

  • Description:  The dissertation embodies the results obtained by a candidate in an investigation relating to some part of the subject of specialisation as outlined in the student's research proposal and as supervised by the Supervisor. The dissertation contains a thorough literature review, research methodology/methods and results of an extended research investigation. It usually doesn't exceed 20,000 words.

IHI801 Research Project (30 credits)

  • Description: The research project shall embody the results obtained by a candidate in an investigation relating to some part of the subject of specialisation as outlined in the student's research proposal and as supervised by the Supervisor. The research project will entail a literature review, research methodology/methods and results of a research investigation. The research project shall not normally exceed 10,000 words.

IHI806 Selected Topic (30 credits)

  • Description: This course enables students to study in depth selected topics from the field of Indigenous or Māori Studies through a programme of readings, seminars, and directed research. Students will be supervised by a lecturer in whose area they are studying. The student will produce a research based project as a part of their assessment. This is a supervised topic.

COURSES (30 credits)

AKO816 Critical Education Pedagogies

Kaiako: Tbc (Semester 1 in Tāmaki Makaurau)

Course Type:  Elective

Description:This paper focuses on critical pedagogies as a means to engage with culturally appropriate frameworks, knowledge's and practices for indigenous peoples within education. The course examines various theories and philosophies to enable students to critique, reflect and engage with transformative educational practices.

IHI803 Research Methods and Methodologies

Kaiako:  Dr Gary Leaf (Semester 1 in Tāmaki Makaurau) and Professor Paul Kayes (Semester 2 in Whakatāne)

Course Type:  Core

Description: This paper will prepare students for the research component of their degree. Students will become aware of a range of ethical considerations informing future projects of research they may undertake and will develop familiarity with associated research jargon.

IHI805 Special Topic (a) - He Rau Aroha Māori Italian War Legacies*

Kaiako:  Dr Reuben Collier (Semester 1, 2020 in Whakatāne)

Course Type:  Elective

Description: This course allows for a special area of study to be offered by a visiting lecturer or invited lecturer with a strong background in a given area of academic study.

Topic 2020: The aim of this paper is to provide an opportunity for tauira to study a military and historical inquest into the personal lives of soldiers, with a particular focus on Monte Cassino. It retraces some of the steps of the Battalion and in doing so will enable tauira to gain an understanding of the social and emotional impacts arising from battles in Italy during the Second World War. Tauira will explore battle sites and gain a deeper appreciation of the impacts on the communities where these battles occurred and the impact on innocent civilian life. *special conditions apply

IHI805 Special Topic (b) - Kākahu Taonga Māori

Kaiako:  Hokimate Harwood (Semester 2, 2020 in Whakatāne)

Course Type:  Elective

Description: This course allows for a special area of study to be offered by a visiting lecturer or invited lecturer with a strong background in a given area of academic study.

Topic 2020: This course examines Taonga Māori with a focus on Kākahu (Feathers and Cloaks). A taonga is defined as a treasured item in a public museum collection, in a private or whānau collection, or a personal taonga. This course looks in depth at Māori feather cloaks, the bird species the feathers came from, and the patterns and styles of weaving used to create cloaks.  It takes a look at changes to cloak creation from pre-European times, through the Cook era and to the present day.

IHI808 Kaitiakitanga

Kaiako: Dr Naomi Simmonds, Prof Paul Kayes & Miki Roderick (Semester 1 in Whakatāne)

Course Type:  Elective

Description:This course examines definitions of Kaitiakitanga. It looks at issues surrounding the concept for Māori and how these issues are managed in the modern day. Students will be expected to present a point of view and debate the varying perspectives Māori may have about Kaitiakitanga. Individuals, committees, iwi, hapū or marae may all give varying weights to the importance of whānau; preservation or conservation of land; being economically viable; stewardship; guardianship; dividends to shareholders; reinvestment; benefiting now; these and other issues will be explored and debated through the examination of selected case studies.

IHI812 Mana Wahine Leadership

Kaiako: Prof Virginia Warriner (Semester 1 in Tāmaki Makaurau)

Course Type:  Elective

Description: This paper will undertake research where Māori women’s leadership contributes to Māori and Indigenous Peoples’ self-determination. Mana Wahine underpins Māori women’s leadership theories, principles and practices. ‘Herstories’ are used to examine Māori women’s discourses of mātauranga wāhine, tikanga Māori, the politics of difference and diverse realities that affirm Mana Wahine leadership.

IHI813 Contemporary Māori/Indigenous Policy Development

Kaiako: Mikki Roderick (Semester 1 in Whakatāne)

Course Type:  Elective

Description: This paper will critically examine and critique the conceptual frameworks and applications of policy development across a range of settings and experiences as it relates to Māori/Indigenous advancement. Moreover, this paper will provide students with culturally appropriate theoretical and practical policy frameworks for successful engagement within Māori/Indigenous best practice organisational settings.

IND802 Critical Theory in Indigenous Studies

Kaiako: Dr Gary Leaf (Semester 2 in Tāmaki Makaurau)

Course Type:  Elective

Description:This course uses the work of indigenous and non-indigenous theorists to critically examine a range of contemporary issues with which indigenous peoples are engaged. Students will study in depth selected topics from the field of indigenous studies through a programme of readings, seminars, lectures and self-directed research. To develop students’ understanding and application of critical theory and critical literacy as tools which promote indigenous people’s aspirations to self-determination, to examine literature on a range of issues of significance to indigenous peoples, and to develop skills in research and analysis. Familiarity with indigenous and Western theories that have relevance to the struggles of indigenous peoples is a prominent objective of this course. An important connecting theme is the multiple ways in which language is used in the construction of indigenous peoples as subjects and in indigenous people’s acts of resistance.

MAO816 Te Reo Wainene (Te Reo)

Kaiako: Tbc (Semester 1 in Tāmaki Makaurau)

Course Type:  Elective

Description:Ko ngā whakamahuki o tēnei pepa, ko te reo haka me te reo i roto i ngā mōteatea. Ka tūhuratia tēnei pepa i ngā hanganga reo o roto i ngā momo mōteatea. Ka titiro ki ngā mōteatea kia kitea ngā mahi a te mōteatea. Ka tātaritia te hanganga o te kupu, te whakatakoto o te reo, ā, ka tātarihia hoki te tangi o ngā momo mōteatea katoa. Ka wānanga i ngā momo mōteatea, ka wānanga i ngā āhuatanga e rite ana, i ngā āhuatanga e rerekē ana, he aha hoki ngā kaupapa o roto i ia momo waiata.
Ka arotakengia ngā titonga mōteatea hou ki ngā mōteatea o mua, ka arotake i ngā whanaketanga.

MAO820 Te Whakarauora (Te Reo)

Kaiako: Dr Agnes McFarland (Semester 1 in Whakatāne)

Course Type:  Elective

Description:The purpose of this paper is to provide in te reo Māori an interpretation, analysis, an examination of the highly ornate oral and written literature contained in the ceremonial performance of karanga and whaikōrero. Within the performance of karanga and whaikōrero other ritualised narratives such as poroporoaki (farewell calls), whenua (land) combined with ā-whanau, ā-hapu, ā-iwi experience, come to the fore.  

MAO822 Advanced Māori Oral and Written Literature

Kaiako: Prof Taiarahia Black (Semester 2 in Whakatāne)

Course Type:  Elective

Description: This course examines and gives Reo and English analysis, interpretation, inquiry of advanced Māori oral and written literature relevant to Mātaatua Waka; whānau, hapū and iwi-marae wānanga. This paper brings together relevant, enduring literature to support the oral traditions of knowledge legacy of marae-tikanga protocols and etiquette to ensure marae-tikanga within the whānau, hapū and iwi knowledge is sustainable into the future. Key concepts of teaching practice include the oral traditions of whaikōrero (formal speech) and karanga (ceremonial calls), whakatauāki (proverbs), pepeha (tribal sayings), karaipiture, (biblical passages), tauparapara (chants), mōteatea (sung-poetry) kōrero tuku iho (inherited stories) and kōrero paki (creative amusing stories). Other forms of written and oral literature will also be examined to give meaning and application to the importance of ordinary and formal conversations and speech. 

MAO823 Te Reo o Te Mōteatea

Kaiako: Prof Taiarahia Black (Semester 1 in Whakatāne)

Course Type:  Elective

Description: This core subject of this paper is mōteatea. Mōteatea will be examined in the reo and English in terms of its analysis, interpretation, inquiry of advanced Māori oral and written literature relevant to Mātaatua Waka; whānau, hapū and iwi-marae wānanga-mōteatea. Traditional and contemporary mōteatea contains insightful poetic commentaries, philosophies, values, biographies, prophetic identities, quotes, biblical passages, historical literature that explain complex views on a range of important and endure knowledge issues. Mōteatea will also be examined in terms of (1) names of the composes, (2) the whānau, hapū and iwi to which each mōteatea belonged, (3) explain the reason for the composition or the inspiration for it, (4) explain some of the archaic words, names of the ancestors, place names or battles, customs or ancient gods. Each mōteatea will be expected to connect and support marae-tikanga protocols and etiquette to ensure marae-tikanga within the whānau, hapū and iwi knowledge is sustainable into the future.

MIB810 Advanced Māori/Indigenous Economic Development

Kaiako: Mikki Roderick (Semester 2 in Whakatāne)

Course Type:  Elective

Description:In this paper, students will gain an understanding of the complexities of balancing competing or complementary economic influences facing Māori and indigenous communities. More specifically it will examine traditional and contemporary notions of economic development, as well as relevant theory, and its application in Māori and indigenous contexts. Furthermore, this paper will provide students with theoretical frameworks and futures-oriented solutions, which will enable them to develop, apply and implement economic development models within Māori and indigenous settings.

ORA801 Hauora Hinengaro: Social Services

Kaiako:Tbc (Semester 2 in Whakatāne)

Course Type:  Elective

Description: This paper will examine and critique the conceptual frameworks and application of social support and services in relation to hauora hinengaro. Moreover, this paper will provide students with theoretical and practical frameworks for successful engagement within Māori/Indigenous best practice within social support and social service frameworks.

ORA802 Hāpori Pakari: Community Development

Kaiako: Tbc (Semester 1 in Whakatāne)

Course Type:  Elective

Description:This paper will examine and critique the conceptual frameworks and application of community development. Moreover, this paper will provide students with theoretical and practical frameworks for successful engagement within Māori/Indigenous communities using culturally cognisant community development frameworks.

REO802 Te Toki Whakahekeheke

Kaiako: Haturini McGarvey (Semester 2 in Whakatāne)

Course Type:  Elective

Description: Ka ruia a taitea, kia toitū te taikākātanga o te reo wainene kei roto i ngā whiti haka ō ihoiho mā. Ka mātaitia ngā tūhaka a te Māori, me te mahi a te haka. Ka tātaritia te hanga o te kupu, te whakatakoto o te rerenga o ngā haka(reo haka), ā ka tātaritia hoki te tātangi o te kupu hei kauhau ariki. Ka whakatewhatia te tiki atu o te kōrero hei kīnaki i te kaupapa o te haka, ka tautohetia te rerekē o te haka ki te mōteatea me te karakia, ā, he aha i kore ai e tuhia te kupu haka e ngā kaituhi pākehā ō mua. Ka titoa he haka i runga anō i ngā tauiratanga ō mua. He wā anō ka arotaketia ngā titonga haka hou, ki te kite i ngā whanaketanga.

REO803 Tā Te Māori Rangahau Kōrero

Kaiako: Haturini McGarvey (Semester 2 in Whakatāne)

Course Type:  Core - Te Reo Māori Thesis writers

Description:  Ko te ngako o te kaupapa nei he wānanga i ngā tūāhuatanga o te rangahau mō te hunga kei te tuhituhi ki te reo Māori, kei te whai hoki i te tirohanga Māori.  Ka āta tirohia te āhua o ngā putunga rangahau a te Māori, mō te Māori anō, i tuhia ki te reo Māori, i whāi rānei i ngā tikanga a te Māori hei huarahi rangahau mā rātou e mārama ai te āhua o tā te Māori tāna rangahau kōrero.  Ko te tikanga ia he āta wānanga i ngā whare kōrero, i ngā marae kōrero, i ngā pātaka kōrero o te Māori, ngā āhuatanga i kīia ai te Māori he iwi whai tikanga, he kawa anō ōna hei āhuatanga rangahau māna.  Ka mutu ko te reo Māori te tāhuhu o te kaupapa nei.  Māna e kōkiri, māna anō e hua ai te ora o te mātauranga, o te wānanga, o te rangahau ki te whai ao, ki te ao mārama.

TAI810 Mana Raraunga: Data Science & Māori

Kaiako: Tbc (Semester 2 in Whakatāne)

Course Type:  Elective

Description: Data has evolved into the most important asset for many Māori organisations and people, and the ability to turn data into information, knowledge and innovative products is crucial for individual and collective success. To leverage the full value and potential of data, Māori require the ability to both manage and analyse the data.  Data scientists drive innovation and impact within businesses and organisations, central and local government, and science and research program. The Data Science & Māori qualification will provide initial preparation for students wishing to integrate data science and analytics into specific research ventures and broader Māori and iwi development initiatives. It brings together topics from data sovereignty and ethics, data governance and management, analytics to data visualisation. And all within a tikanga and kaupapa Māori context.

TOI803 Toi Heke Kowhaiwhai

Kaiako: Dr Agnes McFarland (Semester 2 in Whakatāne)

Course Type:  Elective

Description: This paper provides a post-graduate level introduction to the various methods, procedures, and interpretation of painted rafter patterns associated with the Māori meeting house. The paper familiarises students with a range of design techniques, style, social text, cultural context with the aim of developing an understanding of kōwhaiwhai patterns, practices, values and symbols systems that are acquired, preserved and transmitted within Māori culture. The paper will assist students in developing an in-depth appreciation and understanding the elements of Māori visual arts with the aim of developing useful perspectives for their own research practice.

TOI805 Te Paewhiriwhiri

Kaiako: Annette Wehi (Semester 1 in Tāmaki Makaurau)

Course Type:  Elective

Description:The philosophies, subtleties and nuances of the different iwi in kapa haka performance are diverse. This paper builds upon a student's knowledge of competitive performance and will reflect on their knowledge of the performance of one genre of kapa haka (Poi, haka, Mōteatea or Waiata-ā-ringa). The student will deconstruct that knowledge to be able to analyse and critique the performance to extend their insight from the perspective of a judge (Kaiwhiriwhiri)

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Experience Awanuiārangi

Tomo mai ki Awanuiārangi

Experience Awanuiārangi

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